The SLA set export duties for Canadian coniferous wood when the price of frame wood and random Length composites fell below $355 per thousand board feet (MBF)7, with the rate calculated varying based on the dominant composite price.8 In the first six years of SLA application, dominant timber prices remained well below USD 315 per MBF (see Figure 2) and only exceeded USD 355 per mbF trigger for three months in 2010. From January 2013 to March 2015, timber prices exceeded MBF 355 per month, with the exception of three (August 2013 to October 2013), which means that no export measures were applied in significant quantities for the period 2013, 2014 and the first months of 2015. Prices began to fall in each consecutive month starting in March 2015. The export measures were applied in April 2015 and continued until the expiry of the SLA in October 2015, with the current price of timber ending at 315 MBF.9 In contrast, the large industry organizations in the United States do not wish to renew the contract. The executive director of the U.S. Lumber Coalition, Zoltan Van Heyningen, expressed disapproval of the current format of the agreement. One reason for this is the evolution of the cost of softwood lumber, which the United States believes has not been included in the costs of B.C wood. The Coalition of Members stresses that if negotiations fail, its legal position to ask the US Department of Commerce to file a new case is certain. The SLA has applied export measures (hereinafter referred to as sections) to wood products harvested in the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia (BC) Coastal, BC Interior, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan (see Figure 1). The export measures do not apply to wood products harvested in the Yukon, Northwest or Nunavut territories.

Wood produced in the Atlantic provinces and certified wood originating in the state of Maine were also excluded. . . .